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astronomy-to-zoology:

Longfish Boarfish (Zaclistius elevatus)
…a species of armorhead (Pentacerotidae) which is distributed around the coasts of southern Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand. Longfin boarfish typically occur around the continental shelf and slope at depths of around 30 to 500m (98 to 1,640 ft). 
Classification
Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Perciformes-Pentacerotidae-Zaculistius-Z. elevatus
Image: Ian Skipworth

astronomy-to-zoology:

Longfish Boarfish (Zaclistius elevatus)

…a species of armorhead (Pentacerotidae) which is distributed around the coasts of southern Australia, Tasmania, and New Zealand. Longfin boarfish typically occur around the continental shelf and slope at depths of around 30 to 500m (98 to 1,640 ft). 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Perciformes-Pentacerotidae-Zaculistius-Z. elevatus

Image: Ian Skipworth

pointless-letters:

It’s called common courtesy, Andy. Being nice to a fellow human being and observing the social niceties even if that person happens to be working behind a bar and has to serve you. That way we all get to enjoy a courteous world and you get to avoid being served a special kind of drink called a “sneezer”.

pointless-letters:

It’s called common courtesy, Andy. Being nice to a fellow human being and observing the social niceties even if that person happens to be working behind a bar and has to serve you. That way we all get to enjoy a courteous world and you get to avoid being served a special kind of drink called a “sneezer”.

bbsrc:

Flower forces that bait our bees
Have you ever felt the hairs on your arm stand on end when you brush past an old television screen? Or stuck a balloon to the wall after rubbing it on your jumper? If so you’ve experienced part of the world of static electricity, but you probably haven’t felt the electrical pull of a bee’s wings or the charged electric advertisement of a flower. These tiny electric fields are sensed by bees and used to make important decisions in their lives, like which flowers to visit and which to ignore, and can even help them communicate with each-other inside their hive. 
In the top image you can see yellow electrically charged paint being sprayed on a Geranium flower to reveal the fine structure of their electric fields. 
In the bottom images you can see a computer simulation of the electric field arising from the interaction between a bumblebee and a petunia flower.
Make sure you get to the Great British Bioscience Festival in London in November to find out more about how electricity helps bees pollinate flowers.
To find out more, visit: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/society/exhibitions/gb-bioscience-festival/electrostatic-interactions-flowers-bees.aspx
Top images copyright: Dominic Clarke/Daniel Robert/Heather Whitney 
Bottom image copyright: Dominic Clarke/Julian Harris 
Zoom Info
bbsrc:

Flower forces that bait our bees
Have you ever felt the hairs on your arm stand on end when you brush past an old television screen? Or stuck a balloon to the wall after rubbing it on your jumper? If so you’ve experienced part of the world of static electricity, but you probably haven’t felt the electrical pull of a bee’s wings or the charged electric advertisement of a flower. These tiny electric fields are sensed by bees and used to make important decisions in their lives, like which flowers to visit and which to ignore, and can even help them communicate with each-other inside their hive. 
In the top image you can see yellow electrically charged paint being sprayed on a Geranium flower to reveal the fine structure of their electric fields. 
In the bottom images you can see a computer simulation of the electric field arising from the interaction between a bumblebee and a petunia flower.
Make sure you get to the Great British Bioscience Festival in London in November to find out more about how electricity helps bees pollinate flowers.
To find out more, visit: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/society/exhibitions/gb-bioscience-festival/electrostatic-interactions-flowers-bees.aspx
Top images copyright: Dominic Clarke/Daniel Robert/Heather Whitney 
Bottom image copyright: Dominic Clarke/Julian Harris 
Zoom Info

bbsrc:

Flower forces that bait our bees

Have you ever felt the hairs on your arm stand on end when you brush past an old television screen? Or stuck a balloon to the wall after rubbing it on your jumper? If so you’ve experienced part of the world of static electricity, but you probably haven’t felt the electrical pull of a bee’s wings or the charged electric advertisement of a flower. These tiny electric fields are sensed by bees and used to make important decisions in their lives, like which flowers to visit and which to ignore, and can even help them communicate with each-other inside their hive. 

In the top image you can see yellow electrically charged paint being sprayed on a Geranium flower to reveal the fine structure of their electric fields. 

In the bottom images you can see a computer simulation of the electric field arising from the interaction between a bumblebee and a petunia flower.

Make sure you get to the Great British Bioscience Festival in London in November to find out more about how electricity helps bees pollinate flowers.

To find out more, visit: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/society/exhibitions/gb-bioscience-festival/electrostatic-interactions-flowers-bees.aspx

Top images copyright: Dominic Clarke/Daniel Robert/Heather Whitney 

Bottom image copyright: Dominic Clarke/Julian Harris 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Reef Urchin (Echinometra viridis)
…a species of Echinometrid sea urchin which occurs on reefs in the Caribbean Sea from Florida to Venezuela. Reef urchins will conceal themselves in rock crevices during the day and will emerge at night to feed. Reef urchins are grazers and will feed on a variety of fleshy algae. 
Classification
Animalia-Echinodermata-Echinoidea-Echinacea-Camarodonta-Echinometrida-Echinometra-E. viridis
Image: Nhobgood

astronomy-to-zoology:

Reef Urchin (Echinometra viridis)

…a species of Echinometrid sea urchin which occurs on reefs in the Caribbean Sea from Florida to Venezuela. Reef urchins will conceal themselves in rock crevices during the day and will emerge at night to feed. Reef urchins are grazers and will feed on a variety of fleshy algae. 

Classification

Animalia-Echinodermata-Echinoidea-Echinacea-Camarodonta-Echinometrida-Echinometra-E. viridis

Image: Nhobgood

guy:

idk i kinda dig playing basketball bc i could tell a hot guy “nice d” and he’ll just think im talking about his defensive skills but really